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If you are located in Tasmania, particuluarly Hobart, konw the specific laws that covers the buy and sell of properties. One particular law, the Conveyencing and Law of Property Act 1884 applies to such circumstances.

One of the requirements based on the above mentioned law is that the selling or the intent to sell should always be in writing. Another provision explains about the land sold that is held by lease: 

?Where land sold is held by lease (not including under-lease), the purchaser shall assume, unless the contrary appears, that the lease was duly granted; and on production of the receipt for the last payment due for rent under the lease before the date of actual completion of the purchase, he shall assume, unless the contrary appears, that all the covenants and provisions of the lease have been duly performed and observed up to the date of actual completion of the purchase." - Section 3.3

Another provision states about the inclusion of conveyancing. Thus, in Tasmania, conveyancing is a must and part of the process of buying/selling a property. Section 6 states what is included in a conveyance of land.

Know what are the different rules and provisions when it comes to purcahing or selling a propertyin Hobart.

Buying or selling a property nowadays is easier because of easy to access information from the web. But the ever present of steep prices and hidden charges made by agents and real estate firms makes it hard for a buyer or seller to sell or buy a property easily. Not to mention the hassle encountered by a buyer and/or seller involved in such transactions.

Such circumstances is the main reason behind the creation of PropertyNow. An Australian based and online company, PropertyNow will help you post your property in different well-known real estate listings, not to mention will help you detect any errors in your listings and correct them to avoid having your listings rejected or cancelled.

Know that selling or buying a property in Canberra are covered by the property laws in Australian Capital Territory. Thus it is advisable to also know the specific laws that involves in selling or acquiring a property in Canberra. One specific law is the Real Property Act 1925 and the Land Titles Act 1925. Another law that would be applicable to selling your own property is the Civil Law (Sale of Residential Property) Act 2003. It will be good to acquire some expert advice to help you in the process of selling your property.

If you are located in Victoria, particularly in Melbourne and wants to sell your property, it is best to know determine market price of a property. In this way, you can fairly assessed your property and avoid under or over-pricing your properties. Remember, you aren't the only one selling a property.

Another important thing to remember is to respond to potential buyers immediately. Aside from proper and professional etiquette, buyers doesn't just ask one seller for a possible acquisition of properties. A seller canvass several properties to determine the best estate that will fit his bill. Thus, it is a best practice to respond promptly.

Another tip is to allow inspections and visitations. Hide any items that may destroy the image of your house, not to mention any items you don't want to sell. Sellers would always want to see and evaluate their future properties, and first impressions always last. Thus, it would be wise to cleanup the property and project them wherein buyer will feel at ease when visiting your property. This will help you convince your buyer to sign the contract.

And if you want to avoid having steep charges or hassle process, there are now several ways in posting your property online. But the best way is through real estate listings, but most of these listings comes with a steep price and strict guidelines.

PropertyNow offers their services to help you list your property through several well known real estate listing website, with no steep or hidden charges. They help you submit your listings and be the one to check any errors from your listings that might lead to cancellation or rejection of your listings. Also, PropertyNow will deliver you any messages from potential buyers promptly.

About Brisbane

Brisbane is the third most populous city in Australia with a population of over 2.3 million people. Brisbane City is approximately 3 square kilometres and size with parks covering 8% of the total area. The predominant age group in Brisbane is 25-34 years with most households being made up of childless couples working in a professional occupation. 

Traditional agent commissions in Brisbane

Agent commissions in Queensland are generally the third highest in Australia, to sell a property in Brisbane with a traditional agent you can expect to pay around 2.5% - 2.75% plus GST on average.  On top of a commission, if you sell with a traditional agent, you would also generally pay additional advertising fees which can increase your total cost significantly. For example, in a competitive suburb like Newstead, the top upgrade available on realestate.com.au may be a few thousand dollars. All up, your total cost is likely to be well $14-20,000+ if you decide to sell with a traditional agent as opposed to as low at $694 if you sell your home yourself with the help of PropertyNow.

The real estate market in Brisbane

The real estate market in Brisbane hasn't been slowing down the way southern cities have and is currently experiencing an 'upward sweep' according to YourInvestmentPropertymag, boosted by population growth, low interest rates, and level of affordability compared to other cities.

Dwelling values in Brisbane experienced an annual growth rate of 6.2% over the last 12 months (which is the highest annual growth rate in Brisbane since 2014). House values have grown more strongly then units in the last 12 months with houses being 6.7% higher in value, compared with a 1.2% rise in unit values. 

As of June 2016 median dwelling price is Brisbane is $465,000 with median house values at $500,000 and median unit values of $382,000.

Housing demand is fairly firm and rentals yields are higher than most other capitals, however average weekly rents are down for both houses (down 0.5% over the last 12 months)  and units (down 1.3% over the last 12 months).

The average number of days on the market for sale properties is nearly two months, with 55 days on the market being the average for March 2016 (slightly longer than the average of 46 days on the market in March 2015.) 

Auction clearance rates were at 55% in early June 2016 (compared with 48.% at the same time last year).

Selling property in Brisbane without an agent

We've had excellent feedback from owner's using our service to sell Brisbane based properties, in fact it's one of our most successful locations for both sales and rentals. We do tend to notice that whilst not moving quite as fast as most Sydney properties, Brisbane based properties experience much higher enquiry rates and faster sale times than owners in regional areas where demand is lower.

By not paying an agent a hefty commission you give yourself more room to move on the sale price, putting you at an advantage against similar properties in the market. You can also know for you sure that enquiries are being responded to as quickly as possible and are properly followed up instead of being in the dark as to what's going on. If you're not sure of how to price your property, we can even provide you with a detailed breakdown of sale statistics for Brisbane (or a specific suburb of Brisbane), as well as an estimated value of your property itself.

Testimonial from clients in Brisbane

PropertyNow market properties and support owners to sell privately nationwide. 

Mr Crozier, who sold his Aspley property in 2016 with the help of PropertyNow said "We have been very pleased with the process of selling our house through property now. It was simple and we had a great experience. If you are thinking about selling your home privately then you should definitely give it a go. Its much easier than you think."

Shannon who leased his Fortitude valley property in 2016 with the help of PropertyNow said "I've rented out my apartment effortlessly through Property Now. Highly recommend!"

 

 *Authored June 2016. Please contact us if you require more recent information or advice about leasing or selling a property in Brisbane yourself.

If you're planning to sell your own property in Adelaide, know the process and important things to know behind selling a property. This is to avoid unnecessary burden, hassles and fees when selling an estate.

The most common and important thing to do is to set a proper price. You need to consider the current market trends and how high the demand of a property in Adelaide.

Do some research. Know the prices of similar properties. Make sure that your prices isn't high enough that will discourage potential buyers. Remember, you aren't the only one selling a property.

Also, know that it is illegal to misreprent a property's price to any buyers. This also includes advertising the property at a selling price that is lower than the market trends.

Also know which to sell and what not to sell. Items (also known as chattel) that you don't want to be sold needs to be excluded in the contract of sale.
Remember too that first impression last. So make sure to know how to present your property to your potential buyers before taking some photos for advertising. Also remember to not exclude other potential buyers when presenting a property.

Another thing to know is that all potential buyer would want an open inspections. Thus, it is important to hide any items or particulars that you don't want your potential buyers to see and that might discourage them to proceed in buying your property.

The process of selling your property may be complex and time consuming but with proper preparation, you'll find it easier than expected.

About Perth

Perth is around 5 square kilometres in size with a population of more than 2 million people. The predominant age group in Perth is 25-34 years with households being comprised primarily of childless couples. 

Traditional agent commissions in Perth

To sell a property in Perth via a traditional agent you can expect to pay around 2.5 - 3.25% plus GST on average.  On top of a commission, if you sell with a traditional agent, you would also generally pay additional advertising fees which can increase your total cost significantly. For example, in a competitive suburb, the top upgrade available on realestate.com.au may be several thousand dollars. All up, your total cost is likely to be at least $14,000 if you decide to sell with a traditional agent as opposed to as low at $694 if you sell your home yourself with the help of PropertyNow.

The real estate market in Perth

Experts are suggesting that Perth may be nearing the bottom of its market however it is still very much a buyers market at the moment, with listing numbers higher than a year ago and an average selling time of 61 days (as opposed to just 48 days a year ago). Whether values will stabilise or return to previous growth still remains to be seen. 

Dwelling values in Perth have been declining for more than 12 months but have recently started to stabilise. Overall dwelling values have declined by 2.1% in the last 12 months, and 0.5% in the last three months. 

As of June 2016 the median dwelling value in Perth was $505,000 with median house values at $523,500 and median unit values at $415,000.

Weekly rents have also been falling, with a dramatic drop of 9% over the last year and a median rent of $600 per week.

Selling property in Perth without an agent

We've had a number of clients use our services in Perth specifically, and WA more generally. Given the difficult market conditions in Perth at the moment, by not paying an agent a hefty commission you give yourself more room to move on the sale price, putting you at a significant advantage. You can also know for you sure that enquiries are being responded to as quickly as possible and are properly followed up instead of being in the dark as to what's going on. If you're not sure of how to price your property, we can even provide you with a detailed breakdown of sale statistics for Perrth, as well as an estimated value of your property itself.

Testimonial from clients in Perth

PropertyNow market properties and support owners to sell privately nationwide. We also maintain extended hours to account for the time difference between the eastern and western states.

Peter who sold  his Kallaroo property in 2016 with the help of PropertyNow said "Very good experience from start to finish with Property Now. Easy to use, support when I needed it. And a result!"

Shannon who leased her Burns Beach property in 2016 with the help of PropertyNow said "I was a little bit nervous about doing myself, but decided I would give it a try and could always use an agent if it didn't work out. Well within a week our place was leased out for more than what agents in the area had quoted!"

 *Authored June 2016. Please contact us if you require more recent information or advice about leasing or selling a property in Perth yourself.

About Sydney

The greater Sydney region is around 12, 300 kilometres and is the most populous city in Australia with a population of 4,921,000 and a population density of 400 people per square kilometre in the Greater Sydney region. The predominant age group in Sydney is 25-34 years with households comprised primarily of childless couples. 

Traditional agent commissions in Sydney

Agent commissions in Sydney are generally a little lower than the fees you can expect in more rural areas but are still around 2 - 2.5% of the value of your property. On top of a commission, if you sell with a traditional agent, you would also generally pay additional advertising fees which can increase your total cost significantly. All up, your total cost is likely to be well over $20,000 if you decide to sell with a traditional agent as opposed to as low at $694 if you sell your home yourself with the help of PropertyNow.

The real estate market in Sydney

The real estate market in Sydney has slowed in 2016, values are still rising but not as quickly or dramatically as they were. Dwelling values in Sydney were up 3.9% in the first four months of 2016 and 8.95% over the last 12 months (compared with last year with values were rising at above 18% per annum). Unit values have been growing more strongly than houses and are up by 11.5% over the last 12 months. As of June 2016 median dwelling price is Sydney is $780,000 with median house values at $885,000 and median unit values of $680,000.

Auction clearance rates, which went as low as 52% last year have bounced back with an extraordinary strong clearance rate of $80.1% in early June 2016, however annual home sales in Sydney overall are still down 15% in the last year. 

Despite the increases in property values, weekly rents have changed little over the last 12 month with gross rental yields currently at record lows. 

The average number of days on the market for sale properties is around a month, with 36 days on the market being the average for March 2016 (slightly longer than the average of 27 days on the market in March 2015.) 

Overall, as of Winter 2016, it's still very much a sellers market in Sydney, partiularly in inner-suburban and higer-priced areas. 

Selling property in Sydney without an agent

We've had excellent feedback from owner's using our service to sell Sydney based properties, and we tend to notice that when Sydney based properties experience much higher enquiry rates and faster sale times than owners in regional areas where demand is lower.

By not paying an agent a hefty commission you give yourself more room to move on the sale price, putting you at an advantage against similar properties in the market. You can also know for you sure that enquiries are being responded to as quickly as possible and are properly followed up instead of being in the dark as to what's going on. If you're not sure of how to price your property, we can even provide you with a detailed breakdown of sale statistics for Sydney (or a specific suburb of Sydney), as well as an estimated value of your property itself.

Testimonial from a client in Sydney

PropertyNow market properties and support owners to sell privately nationwide. In March 2016, Sydney Coulson sold his property in Sydney with our help and had this to say "Thanks to Andrew and PropertyNow our home was easy to list, was listed on the two prominent real estate websites within hours of being added to the PropertyNow site and, as good fortune would have it, sold to the first couple who came to view it. After such a positive experience and saving thousands of dollars in commission, can't recommend PropertyNow highly enough as the ideal vehicle for buyers and sellers of real estate to connect with one another. PropertyNow will be the first and only port of call for the next real estate transaction."

 *Authored June 2016. Please contact us if you require more recent information or advice about leasing or selling a property in Sydney yourself.

About Darwin

Darwin is NT's capital city and has a population of more than 80 thousand people with a population density of 7.40 persons per hectare (ABS ERP 2015). The predominate age group in Darwin City is young people aged 20-29 years old, followed by single's and homesharers aged 35-54.

Traditional agent commissions in Darwin

Agent fees in the Northern Territory, including Darwin are deregulated which means that agents get to decide on their own fees for selling a home and aren't limited the way they are in other states. Commissions in the Northern Territory are generally likely to be anywhere from 2.5% to 4%. In terms of the overall state average, commissions are generally a little lower in Darwin than in the rest of the state. The exact rate can vary quite a lot depending on suburb, with rural and sparsely populated areas typically resulting in higher fees. On top of a commission, if you sell with a traditional agent, you would also generally pay additional advertising fees which can increase your total cost significantly. 

The real estate market in Darwin

In June 2015, the City of Darwin's median house valution was around $614,000 (more than $60,000 higher than the mediam value for the Northern Territory overall) (Hometrack 2010-2015, Housing Valuation System). The average number of days on the market is 90 and there were 865 houses sold in the last 12 months. 

The Darwin housing market is relativately msall which means "big projects and investments have a large impact... on the demand for housing" which in turn is reflected in housing prices. According to Eliza Owen of Onthehouse.com.au, values of both houses and units in Darwin have been steadily lowering after a dramtic drop in December 2015. This is likely due to the fall in commodity prices, and the removal of the first home owner grant for existing dwellings resulting in more new dwellings being constructed and first home buyers being better financed to buy those properties. There has been a 4% drop in the value of Darwin houses in the last quarter, with unit values dropping a whopping 6% (their lowest since March 2012). In the short term it is likely that there may be further losses to sale prices. 

The rental market has also been affected by the oversupply of dwellings and the declining population with overall vacancy rates as high as 8.2% for houses. One suburb which has been defying the downturn however is Alawa. It has the lowest vacancy rate in NT at just 0.48% and is in high renter demand. 

It's not all gloomy news though, as according to YourInvestmentPropertyMag, the leasing of the Port of Darwin to a chinese company has "raised Darwin's profile among Chinese investors" as has the growing reputation of of Charles Darwin University and quick international flights to Asian hubs. If you choose to sell your property privately through PropertyNow, we can provide you access to Juwai, as well as the REA group's website for Chinese investors, so that you can capitalize on these points. 

Selling property in Darwin without an agent

By not paying an agent a hefty commission you give yourself more room to move on the sale price, putting you at an advtange against similar properties in a difficult market. You can also know for you sure that enquiries are being responded to as quickly as possible and are properly followed up instead of being in the dark as to what's going on. If you're not sure of how to price your property, we can even provide you with a detailed breakdown of sale statistics for Darwin, as well as an estimated value of your property itself. 

Testimonial from a client in Darwin

PropertyNow market properties and support owners to sell privately nationwide. In June 2016, Nicole Wheeler leased her property in Darwin using our services, she had this to say "Property Now is great! I managed to list and rent my own property within one week in a tough market in Darwin!" You can find our other properties currently for sale and for rent in Darwin through our search page. 

 *Authored June 2016. Please contact us if you require more recent information or advice about leasing or selling a property in Darwin yourself.

 

The first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with the NSW office of fair trading. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in NSW.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale

The first step to selling a property in NSW is having a contract of sale prepared. You must have this done before you begin marketing or conducting inspections. This applies to all properties in NSW except for rural properties. Keep in mind that though you don’t need to have the contract prepared to market a rural property, you will still need it once you have a buyer, so it’s best to get it prepared early.

The contract of sale must include title documents, drainage diagram, current zoning certificate and in some circumstances a swimming pool certificate and other documents, as well as any property exclusions, and a statement of the buyers cooling off rights. If that sounds like a lot to wrap your head around, don’t worry - getting a contract drawn up is really easy, all you have to do is contact a solicitor or conveyancer in your area and they’ll handle everything for you. You can also buy a generated contract online from the NSW Law Society’s ECOS website for a small fee.

Between step 1 and step 2 is when all your marketing and negotiations will happen, these steps are common to all states, so let’s move along to the next step in legally finalising your sale.

Step 2: Signing the contract of sale

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in NSW is for you and the buyer to sign the contract of sale. You will need to have two copies of the contract, one for you to sign and one for the buyer to sign. You should sign your copy, and give it is to the buyer to sign also.

Step 3: Exchange

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. At this point, the buyer may opt to place a 0.25% or more deposit which would generally be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow.

Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 4: Cooling Off

Once the buyer has been provided with a signed copy of the contract, the cooling off period starts. In NSW, the cooling off period is 5 business days. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit 0.25% of the purchase price. You will need to refund any deposit paid, less the 0.25% - if a deposit hasn’t yet been paid, the buyer will owe you the 0.25%. The 0.25% won’t apply if the buyer has cancelled the sale under allowance conditions within the contract of course.

After the cooling off period has ended, the buyer will then need to pay the remainder of 10% of the purchase price. If they have paid the 0.25% deposit initially, this will mean they need to deposit another 9.75% of the purchase price.

The buyer can also waive the cooling off period by signing a 66W certificate. When this happens, it is called “unconditional exchange” once the buyer has paid a total of 10% in deposit.
An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in NSW is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.

Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 5: Settlement

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly six weeks after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyers solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those five steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent.

Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything leave us a comment below or get in touch with us.

If you're thinking about selling your house privately in NT, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Northern Territory Consumer Affairs. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in the NT.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract of sale of land form drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. It should include details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, covenants, easements, zoning, and outgoings. Fixtures and fitting are included by default, and you should specify in your contract if any chattels are to be included. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

If a residential property is less than 1.8 hectares, you will also need to provide documents to the Land Titles Office declaring that there is no pool or spa, or alternatively showing that if there is that it will have a compliant pool safety barrier. There are some exceptions.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.  

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in the NT is for you and the buyer to both sign two copies of the contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In NT, the buyer is entitled to a cooling off period of four business days, however this can be waived or amended if both parties agree. The cooling off period commences the day you or the buyer last signed and exchanged the contract.  During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. However, if the buyer makes their offer on the day of the auction it is generally unconditional with no cooling off period.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less any holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in NT is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.


Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent. Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything just get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au

Selling via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The auction rules and any extra conditions must be on display at the auction beforehand for buyers to view.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction and the contract of sale is unconditional.

If the property is passed in, the highest bidder has the right to negotiate with the vendor.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Sale by Tender

In the NT you can also sell your property by tender. This means that all offers are submitted by a set date and time for consideration.

If you're thinking about selling your house privately in ACT, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Access Canberra. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in the ACT.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your draft contract for the sale of residential property drawn up by your solicitor before advertising your property for sale.

There are various accompanying reports required depending on the type of property, regarding the physical condition of the building and a statement of any provisions that might impact on the allowable use of the house or land. Refer ‘Reality Check – a real estate guide for buyers and sellers in the ACT’ to find out which of the following you will need:

  • The Crown Lease
  • The Certificate of Title
  • A copy of any encumbrance shown on the Certificate of Title
  • A statement about any encumbrance not shown on the Certificate of Title
  • Asbestos assessment report or asbestos advice
  • The deposited plan
  • A Building Conveyancing Enquiry
  • A Lease Conveyancing Enquiry
  • An Energy Efficiency Rating Statement
  • A Building and Inspection Compliance Report
  • A Pest Inspection Report
  • A copy of the unit’s plan or proposed unit’s plan
  • A Certificate of Title for the common property
  • A copy of the minutes of meetings of the owners corporation and executive committee for the last two years
  • A Unit Title Certificate

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections:

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract for sale of residential property. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in the ACT is for you and the buyer to sign the sale contract. You will need to have two copies of the contract, one for you to sign and one for the buyer to sign. You should sign your copy, and give it is to the buyer to sign also. From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

The balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

Once the sale has unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In the ACT, the buyer is entitled to a cooling off period of 5 business days, however this can be waived or amended if both parties agree. To change it you need to obtain legal advice and a signed certificate from a solicitor to give to the seller. The cooling off period commences the first business day after you exchanged the contract.  During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. However, if the buyer makes their offer after bidding at an unsuccessful auction it is generally unconditional with no cooling off period.

If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit 0.25% of the purchase price. You will need to refund any deposit paid, less the 0.25% - if a deposit hasn’t yet been paid, the buyer will owe you the 0.25%. The 0.25% won’t apply if the buyer has cancelled the sale under allowable conditions within the contract of course.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less any holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in the ACT is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. They must also reimburse the cost of the building and compliance inspection report, and pest inspection report. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent.

Selling via Auction:

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The auction conditions, contract for sale of residential property and required documents must be on display for at least 30 minutes before the auction starts.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. If no reserve was set, then the highest bidder wins at any price. There is no cooling-off period and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Selling by Tender:

This method of selling can also be used. Buyers are required to submit their written offer by a specified time, and the seller can choose to accept the highest bid (or not). A holding deposit may be required with the bid. There is no cooling off period under this method.

If you're thinking about selling your property privately in Queensland, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with the Office of Fair Trading Queensland. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Queensland.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by a solicitor before advertising your property for sale. It will need to include a warning statement directly above where the buyer signs, you can find the wording of this here http://www.qld.gov.au/law/housing-and-neighbours/buying-and-selling-a-property/buying-a-home/making-an-offer-on-a-home/contract-of-sale/ . In your contract, specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

If you have a pool then you must either obtain a pool safety certificate from a licensed inspector, or give the buyer a Form 36 – ‘notice of no pool safety certificate’ before selling (available from QBCC at https://www.qbcc.qld.gov.au/home-building-owners/pool-safety/selling-or-leasing-property-pool ). A copy of the completed Form 36 must be sent to QBCC before settlement. The buyer must obtain a pool safety certificate within 90 days of settlement.

We can provide you with a free digital copy of a blank contract of sale, as well as any related forms - or we can recommend a terrific solicitor we work with if you'd like everything done for you. 

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections:

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. Prospective buyers may then request a copy of the contract of sale.

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Only written offers can lead to a binding contract. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in QLD is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In QLD, the buyer of residential property is entitled to a cooling off period of five business days (there are some exceptions). The cooling off period commences from when the buyer receives a copy of the contract of sale signed by both parties. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale but will have to pay the seller a termination penalty of up to 0.25 per cent of the sale price. The deposit must be refunded within 14 days.

Be aware that there is no cooling off period after an unsuccessful auction when:

  • an offer is accepted within two full business days after the auction, or
  • the buyer was a registered bidder.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must notify the seller or their agent in writing, sign it and deliver it by 5pm on the fifth day. They can do so in person, by email or fax.

You can cancel or reduce the cooling off period if you want to by notifying the seller or their agent in writing.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in QLD is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.
With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent. Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything leave us a comment below or get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au

Selling via Auction:

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. If there is no reserve price, then the highest bidder wins. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

In Tasmania, the common way to make an offer to buy real estate is by the purchaser signing a formal offer in the form of a contract, which outlines the important terms of the transaction.
Currently there is a ‘pro-forma’ Contract For Sale of Real Estate commonly used by real estate agents, conveyancers, and solicitors.

This contract is in two parts:

  1. Standard Conditions of Sale; and
  2. Particulars of Sale

The two parts together form the contract. Use of this form of contract is not mandatory and this form of contract can be adapted by agreement between vendor and purchaser.

The purchaser’s formal offer to purchase the property will include details such as:
(a) The purchase price being offered by the Purchaser;
(b) The details of the deposit offered;
(c) The description of the property and details of chattels (e.g. stove, curtains, heaters) being sold with the property;
(d) The timeframe proposed by the purchaser for settlement;
(e) ‘Conditions precedent’ required by the purchaser which may commonly include:
(i)  A finance condition – that the Purchaser can get the money they need to buy;
(ii) A building inspection report condition – the Purchaser has had the property independently inspected;
(iii) A condition regarding the offer being subject to the sale of the purchaser’s home – if the purchaser cannot buy a new house without selling their current house;
(iv) A condition that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the property which may hinder or prevent its use for the purpose proposed by the purchaser (e.g. the Purchaser may only wish to purchase the property if they can secure council approval for development for units, for example).

At the time of writing change to existing state legislation is being discussed which may result in the introduction of a Vendor Statement which will be required when selling. Unlike other states except WA, at the time of writing, there is no mandatory cooling off period for a property transaction within Tasmania.

The first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with South Australian Consumer and Business Services. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in South Australia.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. This will include the Vendor’s Statement (called a Form 1) which includes details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, easements, zoning and outgoings. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

The Vendor’s Statement must be given to a private treaty buyer at least 10 clear days before settlement.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. At this time (or on request), you should provide prospective buyers with a copy of the Buyers Information Notice (‘Form R3’), available here: http://www.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/18857/Form-R3.pdf . You can supplement this with the ‘Assessing suitability of a property statement’, downloadable here: http://www.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0013/10714/Assessing_suitability_of_a_property_statement.pdf .

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Every offer and counter-offer must be put in writing and signed. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may only take a holding deposit of up to $100.
This would generally be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in SA is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale.

There should be two copies of the contract, one for you and one for the buyer to both sign. From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In SA, the buyer is entitled to a cooling off period of two business days. This commences from the latter of when the vendors statement was received and when the contract of sale was signed. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit the holding deposit.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must complete a signed cooling-off notice and deliver it to the vendor or their agent via registered post, fax or in person.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less $100 holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in SA is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly six weeks after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those five steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent. Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything leave us a comment below or get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au

Selling via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The vendor’s statement (Form 1) and buyer’s information notice (Form R3) must be available for inspection for at least three business days prior to the auction at the auctioneer’s or agent’s office, and must be on display at the auction for at least 30 minutes prior to the auction start time. The reserve price cannot be more than 110% higher than the price you stated in the sales agency agreement if you are using an agent.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction. If the property is passed in, but the sale is negotiated after on the same day as the auction, there is still no cooling-off period.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

If you're thinking about selling privately in Victoria, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Consumer Affairs Victoria. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Victoria. Whilst reading these steps, keep in mind that, if you decide to sell with PropertyNow, we'll be there to help you every step of the way.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. They will also need to prepare a Vendor’s Statement (also known as a Section 32) which includes details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, covenants, easements, zoning, outgoings and declaration if located in a bushfire-prone area. You must sign this legal document, and if it is found to be inaccurate or incomplete the buyer can take legal action or back out of their purchase. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

The Vendor’s Statement must be made available at all open for inspections, and given to the buyer before the property is sold.

If you are selling in an owners’ corporation, it is required that you provide an owners’ corporation certificate with related documents.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. At this time (or on request), you must provide prospective buyers with a copy of the Due Diligence Checklist, available here: https://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/housing-and-accommodation/buying-and-selling-property/checklists/due-diligence .

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Only written offers can lead to a binding contract. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in VIC is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In VIC, the buyer of a residential or small rural property is entitled to a cooling off period of three business days (there are some exceptions). The cooling off period commences from when the buyer (not the vendor) signs the contract of sale. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll forfeit the greater of $100 or 0.2 per cent of the sale price with any balance being refunded.

Be aware that an offer accepted within three full business days before or after an auction has no cooling-off period.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must complete a signed cooling-off notice and deliver it to the vendor or their authorised agent.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in VIC is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.

Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent. Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything leave us a comment below or get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au

Selling via Auction:

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The Victorian auction rules and auction information statement must be on display at the auction for at least 30 minutes prior to the auction start time. Penalties apply for breaking these rules.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction (or within three days before or after) and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

The first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property in Western Australia without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with the Department of Commerce in Western Australia. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Western Australia.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:
Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by your solicitor or licensed settlement agent (conveyancer) before advertising your property for sale. This is known as the Contract for Sale of Land or Strata Title by Offer and Acceptance (or O and A for short).  They will also need to provide a Joint Form of General Conditions for the Sale of Land (the General Agreement) to the buyer and vendor when an offer is made. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

Step 2: Setting your price:
When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

  • Request a free property valuation report online at PropertyNow.com.au, and if available you will also receive a free property suburb report for your postcode. Research similar sold properties and for sale properties online
  • Obtain a valuation from an independent property Valuer.
  • Request a property valuation estimate or range from real estate agents.

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections
Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.

Step 4 is Receiving the offer: Offers are submitted in the way of a signed O and A. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer. No deposit is necessary however.

Step 5 is Signing the contract of sale: The next step in the legal process of selling a property in WA is for you to sign the O and A. Once the document is signed by you and the buyer is notified that you have accepted, it becomes a binding contract of sale. Any changes or counter-offers can be made on the O and A and initialled. A copy must be given to the buyer and vendor.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

In WA, there is no cooling off period for the buyer or seller so you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites. 

Step 7 is Settlement: On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 60 days after exchange. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.
With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent.

Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything leave us a comment below or get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au


Selling via Auction
If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

On the day of the auction you should set your minimum price with the auctioneer, this is the reserve. Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period and the contract of sale is unconditional. The winning bidder signs the offer to buy, which is then accepted and signed by the auctioneer on behalf of the vendor.

The deposit which is usually 10% is immediately payable at the end of the auction.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.