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Are you wondering "Can I private sell my house NSW"? The first thing to consider is whether you have a legal right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with the NSW office of fair trading. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to actually selling your own home in NSW.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale for real estate NSW

The first step to selling a property in NSW is having a contract of sale prepared. You must have this done before you begin marketing or conducting inspections. This applies to all properties in NSW except for rural properties. Keep in mind that though you don’t need to have the contract prepared to market a rural property, you will still need it once you have a buyer, so it’s best to get it prepared early.

The contract of sale must include title documents, drainage diagram, current zoning certificate and in some circumstances a swimming pool certificate and other documents, as well as any property exclusions, and a statement of the buyers cooling off rights. If that sounds like a lot to wrap your head around, don’t worry - getting a contract drawn up is really easy, all you have to do is contact a solicitor or conveyancer in your area and they’ll handle everything for you. You can also buy a generated contract online from the NSW Law Society’s ECOS website for a small fee.

Between step 1 and step 2 is when all your marketing and negotiations will happen, these steps are common to all states, so let’s move along to the next step in legally finalising your sale.

Step 2: Signing the contract of sale for real estate NSW

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in NSW is for you and the buyer to sign the contract of sale. You will need to have two copies of the contract, one for you to sign and one for the buyer to sign. You should sign your copy, and give it to the buyer to sign also.

Step 3: Exchange of real estate New South Wales

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. At this point, the buyer may opt to place a 0.25% or more deposit which would generally be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow.

Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 4: Cooling Off period in New South Wales

Once the buyer has been provided with a signed copy of the contract, the cooling-off period starts. In NSW, the cooling-off period is five business days. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit 0.25% of the purchase price. You will need to refund any deposit paid, (less the 0.25%) and if the deposit was outstanding, the buyer will owe you the 0.25%. The 0.25% won’t apply if the buyer has cancelled the sale under allowance conditions within the contract of course.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the buyer will then need to pay the remainder of the deposit; which is 10% of the purchase price. If they have paid the 0.25% deposit initially, this will mean they need to deposit another 9.75% of the purchase price.

The buyer can also waive the cooling-off period by signing a 66W certificate. When this happens, it is called “unconditional exchange” once the buyer has paid the 10% deposit.
An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling-off periods in NSW is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.

Once the sale has cooled off or is unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on your marketing.

Step 5: Settlement of Real Estate NSW

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly six weeks after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyers solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those five steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent and saved yourself some money at the same time.

Cooling Off Period

5 business days. Buyer forfeits 0.25% of the purchase price to the seller.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus


Like most states in Australia, the coronavirus impacted the property market in Australia and NSW was no exception. The Australian Government was quick to roll out some coronavirus stimulus packages and as a result, the market cooled but didn’t drop as dramatically as some had feared.


Due to COVID restrictions in NSW, properties were removed from the market, auctions and inspections were cancelled and as a direct result, overall activity dropped too. However, despite this, NSW property prices during the coronavirus pandemic remained rather buoyant with its capital city of Sydney growing .4% during the restriction-laden month of April. Aside from restrictions (which eased during May/June), the pandemic did not affect the property transaction process, and the NSW property market is returning to normal as buyers and sellers gain confidence in a recovering economy.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in NSW
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

If you're thinking about selling your house privately in NT, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Northern Territory Consumer Affairs. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in the NT.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract of sale of land form drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. It should include details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, covenants, easements, zoning, and outgoings. Fixtures and fitting are included by default, and you should specify in your contract if any chattels are to be included. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

If a residential property is less than 1.8 hectares, you will also need to provide documents to the Land Titles Office declaring that there is no pool or spa, or alternatively showing that if there is that it will have a compliant pool safety barrier. There are some exceptions.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.  

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in the NT is for you and the buyer to both sign two copies of the contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In the NT, the buyer is entitled to a cooling-off period of four business days, however this can be waived or amended if both parties agree. The cooling-off period commences the day you or the buyer last signed and exchanged the contract.  During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. However, if the buyer makes their offer on the day of the auction it is generally unconditional with no cooling-off period.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less any holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling-off periods in the NT is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on your marketing.


Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent. Hopefully we’ve demystified the sale process for you somewhat but if you’re still confused about anything just get in touch with us at propertynow.com.au

Selling via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The auction rules and any extra conditions must be on display at the auction beforehand for buyers to view.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction and the contract of sale is unconditional.

If the property is passed in, the highest bidder has the right to negotiate with the vendor.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Sale by Tender

In the NT you can also sell your property by tender. This means that all offers are submitted by a set date and time for consideration.

Cooling Off Period

2 business days. Purchase deposit and holding deposit are refunded to the buyer.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus

As one of Australia’s most scarcely populated states, the NT draws property data mainly from its capital city of Darwin and when the coronavirus pandemic hit it left many people wondering how the Darwin property market would fare. Having reached its peak in 2010, property prices were slowly recovering before the pandemic occurred.


However, recent data shows that the capital city experienced 1.7% growth for the month of April when the pandemic restrictions across the country were in full force.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in NT
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

If you're thinking about selling your house privately in ACT, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Access Canberra. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in the ACT.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your draft contract for the sale of residential property drawn up by your solicitor before advertising your property for sale.

There are various accompanying reports required depending on the type of property, regarding the physical condition of the building and a statement of any provisions that might impact on the allowable use of the house or land. Refer ‘Reality Check – a real estate guide for buyers and sellers in the ACT’ to find out which of the following you will need:

  • The Crown Lease
  • The Certificate of Title
  • A copy of any encumbrance shown on the Certificate of Title
  • A statement about any encumbrance not shown on the Certificate of Title
  • Asbestos assessment report or asbestos advice
  • The deposited plan
  • A Building Conveyancing Enquiry
  • A Lease Conveyancing Enquiry
  • An Energy Efficiency Rating Statement
  • A Building and Inspection Compliance Report
  • A Pest Inspection Report
  • A copy of the unit’s plan or proposed unit’s plan
  • A Certificate of Title for the common property
  • A copy of the minutes of meetings of the owners corporation and executive committee for the last two years
  • A Unit Title Certificate

Step 2: Setting your price:

Request a free property valuation report online

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections:

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract for sale of residential property. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in the ACT is for you and the buyer to sign the sale contract. You will need to have two copies of the contract, one for you to sign and one for the buyer to sign. You should sign your copy, and give it is to the buyer to sign also. From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

The balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

Once the sale has unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In the ACT, the buyer is entitled to a cooling-off period of five business days, however this can be waived or amended if both parties agree. To change it you need to obtain legal advice and a signed certificate from a solicitor to give to the seller. The cooling-off period commences the first business day after you exchanged the contract.  During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. However, if the buyer makes their offer after bidding at an unsuccessful auction it is generally unconditional with no cooling-off period.

If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit 0.25% of the purchase price. You will need to refund any deposit paid, less the 0.25% - if a deposit hasn’t yet been paid, the buyer will owe you the 0.25%. The 0.25% won’t apply if the buyer has cancelled the sale under allowable conditions within the contract of course.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less any holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling-off periods in the ACT is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on your marketing.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. They must also reimburse the cost of the building and compliance inspection report, and pest inspection report. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent.

Selling via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The auction conditions, contract for sale of residential property and required documents must be on display for at least 30 minutes before the auction starts.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. If no reserve was set, then the highest bidder wins at any price. There is no cooling-off period and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Selling by Tender

This method of selling can also be used. Buyers are required to submit their written offer by a specified time, and the seller can choose to accept the highest bid (or not). A holding deposit may be required with the bid. There is no cooling-off period under this method.

Cooling Off Period

5 business days. Buyer forfeits 0.25% of the purchase price to the seller.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus

The property market in the ACT during the coronavirus pandemic was managed to stay afloat, in fact Canberra’s property prices recorded neutral 0% change during the month of April when the pandemic and restrictions were at its greatest.

In a bid to prepare and stablilise the economy, the ACT Government quickly rolled out an Economic Stimulus Package and this supported the banks’ move to defer mortgage repayments to home owners. Together this helped the property market in ACT remain rather buoyant. In the wake of coronavirus, sellers are once again putting their homes on the market and this has been well received by buyers, with data showing an uptake in the volume of listings and properties sold as of June 2020.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in ACT
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

If you're thinking about selling your property privately in Queensland, the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with the Office of Fair Trading Queensland. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Queensland.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:

Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by a solicitor before advertising your property for sale. It will need to include a warning statement directly above where the buyer signs, you can find the wording of this here http://www.qld.gov.au/law/housing-and-neighbours/buying-and-selling-a-property/buying-a-home/making-an-offer-on-a-home/contract-of-sale/ . In your contract, specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

If you have a pool then you must either obtain a pool safety certificate from a licensed inspector, or give the buyer a Form 36 – ‘notice of no pool safety certificate’ before selling (available from QBCC at https://www.qbcc.qld.gov.au/home-building-owners/pool-safety/selling-or-leasing-property-pool ). A copy of the completed Form 36 must be sent to QBCC before settlement. The buyer must obtain a pool safety certificate within 90 days of settlement.

We can provide you with a free digital copy of a blank contract of sale, as well as any related forms.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections:

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. Prospective buyers may then request a copy of the contract of sale.

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Only written offers can lead to a binding contract. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in QLD is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In QLD, the buyer of residential property is entitled to a cooling-off period of five business days (there are some exceptions). The cooling-off period commences from when the buyer receives a copy of the contract of sale signed by both parties. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale but will have to pay the seller a termination penalty of up to 0.25 per cent of the sale price. The deposit must be refunded within 14 days.

Be aware that there is no cooling-off period after an unsuccessful auction when:

  • an offer is accepted within two full business days after the auction, and
  • the buyer was a registered bidder.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must notify the seller or their agent in writing, sign it and deliver it by 5pm on the fifth day. They can do so in person, by email or fax.

You can cancel or reduce the cooling-off period if you want to by notifying the seller or their agent in writing.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling-off periods in QLD is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.
With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent.

Selling via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. If there is no reserve price, then the highest bidder wins. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Cooling Off Period

5 business days. Seller keeps 0.25% of the purchase price from the buyer’s deposit.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus

Like most states in Australia, the coronavirus pandemic brought with it various social restrictions which affected the Queensland property market. The various restrictions impacted on the inspection process and the auction process namely.

Sellers were rather quick to adapt, offering online virtual tours of their properties to combat the restrictions and allow potential buyers to see the property from their device. However, property transactions were still made during the first and second quarter of 2020 in Queensland, despite a lot of properties being taken off the market, and the figures do indicate rather resilient consumer confidence. As conditions return to normal, sellers will be able to continue hosting inspections and selling their homes just like they did prior to coronavirus.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in QLD
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

Sell Real Estate In Tasmania

No agent sale in Tasmania

Talking with Leon Compton on ABC Radio, our licensee Andrew Blachut discusses the options for selling your home in Tasmania. Can owners negotiate a better deal on commissions? In fact Mr Blachut argues that homeowners can sell without paying a commission at all! Play the audio to hear more.

How selling a house in Tasmania works

In Tasmania, the common way to make an offer to buy real estate is by the purchaser signing a formal offer in the form of a contract, which outlines the important terms of the transaction.
Currently there is a ‘pro-forma’ Contract For Sale of Real Estate commonly used by real estate agents, conveyancers, and solicitors.

This contract is in two parts:

  1. Standard Conditions of Sale; and
  2. Particulars of Sale

The two parts together form the contract. Use of this form of contract is not mandatory and this form of contract can be adapted by agreement between vendor and purchaser.

The purchaser’s formal offer to purchase the property will include details such as:
(a) The purchase price being offered by the Purchaser;
(b) The details of the deposit offered;
(c) The description of the property and details of chattels (e.g. stove, curtains, heaters) being sold with the property;
(d) The timeframe proposed by the purchaser for settlement;
(e) ‘Conditions precedent’ required by the purchaser which may commonly include:
(i)  A finance condition – that the Purchaser can get the money they need to buy;
(ii) A building inspection report condition – the Purchaser has had the property independently inspected;
(iii) A condition regarding the offer being subject to the sale of the purchaser’s home – if the purchaser cannot buy a new house without selling their current house;
(iv) A condition that there are no legal restrictions on the use of the property which may hinder or prevent its use for the purpose proposed by the purchaser (e.g. the Purchaser may only wish to purchase the property if they can secure council approval for development for units, for example).

At the time of writing change to existing state legislation is being discussed which may result in the introduction of a Vendor Statement which will be required when selling. Unlike other states except WA, at the time of writing, there is no mandatory cooling-off period for a property transaction within Tasmania.

Tasmanian private seller review

Michael sold his property in Lenah Valley in April 2018 and said "Very good website, with good functionality and very easy to use. Great brochures, and For Sale sign. Would recommend to anyone as the best way to sell your home." View the sold listing

Cooling Off Period

No cooling-off periods apply to the sale of any property in Tasmania.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus


Like other states in Australia, Tasmania’s property market felt the repercussions of coronavirus and the heavy restrictions that were put in place in the first half of 2020. As a direct result of this; just like all other states, the amount of properties for sale plummeted, as sellers withdrew their homes from the market while isolation and changed inspection protocols took hold. While the number of properties on the market dropped, so too did property prices during that time. However, with the relaxation of restrictions into June 2020, and the property market returning to pre-coronavirus conditions, experts predict Tasmania’s property market to hold its ground as consumer confidence returns.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in TAS
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

Are you wondering "Can I private sell my house SA"? The first thing to consider is whether you have a legal right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in South Australia.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale in real estate SA

Ensure you have your contract drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. This will include the Vendor’s Statement (called a Form 1) which includes details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, easements, zoning and outgoings. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

The Vendor’s Statement must be given to a private treaty buyer at least 10 clear days before settlement.

Step 2: Setting your price:

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. At this time (or on request), you should provide prospective buyers with a copy of the Buyers Information Notice (‘Form R3’), available here: http://www.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/18857/Form-R3.pdf . You can supplement this with the ‘Assessing suitability of a property statement’, downloadable here: http://www.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0013/10714/Assessing_suitability_of_a_property_statement.pdf .

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Every offer and counter-offer must be put in writing and signed. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may only take a holding deposit of up to $100.
This would generally be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale for real estate SA:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in SA is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale.

There should be two copies of the contract, one for you and one for the buyer to both sign. From this point, you could consider marking your property as Under Contract on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange of real estate SA:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off:

In SA, the buyer is entitled to a cooling-off period of two business days. This commences from the latter of when the vendors statement was received and when the contract of sale was signed. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll have to forfeit any holding deposit that may have been held.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must complete a signed cooling-off notice and deliver it to the vendor or their agent via registered post, fax or in person.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less $100 holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling off periods in SA is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.
Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on your marketing.

Step 8: Settlement of real estate SA:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly six weeks after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those five steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent, and you’ve probably saved yourself a lot of commission money.

Selling via Auction for Real estate southern Australia

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

The vendor’s statement (Form 1) and buyer’s information notice (Form R3) must be available for inspection for at least three business days prior to the auction at the auctioneer’s or agent’s office, and must be on display at the auction for at least 30 minutes prior to the auction start time. The reserve price cannot be more than 110% higher than the price you stated in the sales agency agreement if you are using an agent.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction. If the property is passed in, but the sale is negotiated after on the same day as the auction, there is still no cooling-off period.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Cooling Off Period

2 business days. Deposits paid over $100 are refunded in full, however the buyer forfeits their holding deposit.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus



Real estate property prices in South Australia in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic have remained rather stable and somewhat resilient. In fact, recent figures show property sales are pretty much on par for March and April 2020 as they were the year before, holding South Australian property in good stead.

The Real Estate Institute of South Australia predicts the property market will remain buoyant as the country navigates its way out of current pandemic restrictions, and notes a drop in the amount of properties on the market during this time. With that said, property prices haven’t really been affected and as the market returns to normal, more sellers will list their properties and in retrospect more active buyers will return to the market.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in SA
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

If you're thinking "Can I privately sell my house Victoria?" the first thing to consider is whether you have a right to sell your property without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. If you’re at all worried about this, you can confirm it with Consumer Affairs Victoria. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Victoria. Whilst reading these steps, keep in mind that, if you decide to sell with PropertyNow, we'll be there to help you every step of the way.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale for real estate Victoria:

Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by your solicitor or conveyancer before advertising your property for sale. They will also need to prepare a Vendor’s Statement (also known as a Section 32) which includes details of the property title, outstanding mortgages, covenants, easements, zoning, outgoings and declaration if located in a bushfire-prone area. You must sign this legal document, and if it is found to be inaccurate or incomplete the buyer can take legal action or back out of their purchase. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded, such as pot plants or appliances. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

The Vendor’s Statement must be made available at all open for inspections, and given to the buyer before the property is sold.

If you are selling in an owners’ corporation, it is required that you provide an owners’ corporation certificate with related documents.

Step 2: Setting a price on real estate Victoria

When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections

Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections. At this time (or on request), you must provide prospective buyers with a copy of the Due Diligence Checklist, available here: https://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/housing-and-accommodation/buying-and-selling-property/checklists/due-diligence .

Step 4: Receiving the offer:

Generally, offers are submitted in the way of a signed contract of sale. Only written offers can lead to a binding contract. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer to the sales contract.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer.

Step 5: Signing the contract of sale for real estate Victoria:

The next step in the legal process of selling a property in Victoria is for you and the buyer to both sign the contract of sale. Once an offer is counter-signed by the vendor it becomes an enforceable contract of sale. All signatories must be given a copy.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as “Under Contract” on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

Step 6: Exchange of real estate VIC:

Exchange simply means that both you and the buyer have signed a copy of the contract of sale and have exchanged these with each other. Exchange doesn’t necessarily have to happen in person, it can also be done via mail, email or via a third party such as your conveyancer. Keep in mind that you and the buyer aren’t legally bound until all copies of the contract have been signed and exchanged.

Step 7: Cooling Off of real estate VIC:

In VIC, the buyer of a residential or small rural property is entitled to a cooling-off period of three business days (there are some exceptions). The cooling-off period commences from when the buyer (not the vendor) signs the contract of sale. During this time, the buyer can cancel the sale. If the buyer cancels the sale in this period, they’ll forfeit the greater of $100 or 0.2 per cent of the sale price with any balance being refunded.

Be aware that an offer accepted within three full business days before or after an auction has no cooling-off period.

To withdraw from a sale, the buyer must complete a signed cooling-off notice and deliver it to the vendor or their authorised agent.

After the cooling-off period has ended, the balance of the deposit is payable by the buyer and should be held in trust until settlement occurs (e.g. 10% of the purchase price less holding deposit).

An important thing to keep in mind with regards to cooling-off periods in VIC is that they only apply to the buyer, once you’ve exchanged contracts, you cannot simply cancel the sale as a seller.

Once the sale has cooled off or unconditionally exchanged, you can go ahead and mark it as sold on the websites.

Step 8: Settlement:

On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 90 days after exchange but this can be varied if both parties agree. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.

With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without hefty agent fees.

Selling via Auction:

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so the date and time can be included on your advertising.

The Victorian auction rules and auction information statement must be on display at the auction for at least 30 minutes prior to the auction start time. Penalties apply for breaking these rules.

Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period for a property sold at auction (or within three days before or after) and the contract of sale is unconditional.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Cooling Off Period

3 business days. Buyer must pay 0.2% of the purchase price to the seller.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus

When the Coronavirus pandemic hit Australia in the first quarter of 2020, it had a profound effect on the inspection process, which in turn affected property sales across the state. It left a lot of people wondering how the coronavirus would affect the property market.

In April, home inspections were banned across Victoria (with the exception of vacant properties), which meant the only way a buyer could view a property, was through a virtual tour. Statistics show a large number of sellers removed their homes from the market during this time and the state’s capital city of Melbourne showed a slight slide in property prices as a result. As the market returns to normal selling conditions, homeowners are continuing to sell their properties in the same way they had prior to the pandemic.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in VIC
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent:

Are you asking yourself "Can I private sell my house WA"? The first thing to consider is whether you have a legal right to sell your property in Western Australia without an agent. The answer is yes, you absolutely do. With that out of the way, let’s discuss the steps to selling your own home in Western Australia.

Step 1: Preparing the contract of sale:
Ensure you have your contract of sale drawn up by your solicitor or licensed settlement agent (conveyancer) before advertising your property for sale. This is known as the Contract for Sale of Land or Strata Title by Offer and Acceptance (or O and A for short).  They will also need to provide a Joint Form of General Conditions for the Sale of Land (the General Agreement) to the buyer and vendor when an offer is made. In your contract specify if any chattels are to be excluded. Dishwashers, rangehoods, curtains and blinds are generally included in the sale.

Step 2: Setting your price:
When you set your price ensure it does not misrepresent the property’s sale price, as that is illegal. The selling price should not be lower than an agent’s estimated price or the lowest amount you would accept. To research your price, you can:

  • Request a free property valuation report online at PropertyNow.com.au, and if available you will also receive a free property suburb report for your postcode. Research similar sold properties and for sale properties online
  • Obtain a valuation from an independent property Valuer.
  • Request a property valuation estimate or range from real estate agents.

Step 3: Open Homes and Private Inspections
Once your property is advertised you will likely need to allow buyers to inspect the property through open homes or private inspections.

Step 4 is Receiving the offer: Offers are submitted in the way of a signed O and A. Sometimes buyers may add an expiration clause to the sale contract so that the offer does not remain open indefinitely if the vendor has not signed by a certain date. Have your solicitor or conveyancer review any changes made by the buyer.

If someone makes you an offer on your property you may take a holding deposit of the full amount or a nominated partial amount. This should be held in your solicitor’s trust account or a trust account you’ve arranged through PropertyNow, to be returned if you do not accept the offer. No deposit is necessary however.

Step 5 is Signing the contract of sale of real estate WA: The next step in the legal process of selling a property in WA is for you to sign the O and A. Once the document is signed by you and the buyer is notified that you have accepted, it becomes a binding contract of sale. Any changes or counter-offers can be made on the O and A and initialled. A copy must be given to the buyer and vendor.

From this point, you could consider marking your property as Under Contract on various websites, but you should still keep a record of any enquiries from other buyers in case the sale falls through.

In real estate WA, there is no cooling-off period for the buyer or seller so you can go ahead and mark it as sold on your marketing. 

Step 7 is Settlement: On signing the contract, you and the buyer will agree to a settlement date. Settlement is commonly 30 to 60 days after exchange. At settlement the buyer 'settles' their purchase by paying the purchase price, less their deposit. If you're using a solicitor, they may meet with the buyer’s solicitor to ensure they have everything needed for the sale to proceed.
With those steps out of the way it’s time to put your feet up and congratulate yourself on a job well done – you’ve just successfully sold your house without an agent, and potentially saved yourself on some commission in the process.

Sell Real Estate WA via Auction

If there is high demand for your property you may prefer to sell it at auction. Ideally you should book your Auctioneer prior to listing your property, so that the date and time can be included in any advertising.

On the day of the auction you should set your minimum price with the auctioneer, this is the reserve. Once the reserve price is met or exceeded, then the property is sold. There is no cooling-off period and the contract of sale is unconditional. The winning bidder signs the offer to buy, which is then accepted and signed by the auctioneer on behalf of the vendor.

The deposit which is usually 10% is immediately payable at the end of the auction.

Settlement occurs in the same way as for a private treaty sale.

Cooling Off Period

No cooling-off periods apply unless specified within the sale contract.

Want to know more? Read 4 things you should know about the cooling off period

Selling your home during coronavirus



Just like many other states across Australia, the coronavirus pandemic had a significant effect on the number of properties sold during the first quarter in 2020. Prices aside, Western Australian metropolitan areas sold more than 1000 properties each in January, February and March of 2020, but in April when the pandemic was intense, there were only 179 properties sold. During April, COVID-19 restrictions meant open homes were limited to only 10 people, and sellers used virtual tours and online videos as a way to reach buyers.

In direct correlation with the rest of the country, sellers chose to withdraw their properties from the market when the pandemic hit, however WA was quicker than some other states to lift restrictions. By late April, open homes had recommenced and sellers once again started listing their homes on the market as conditions returned to normal.

You don't have to use an agent to sell your own house in WA
Did you know PropertyNow can list your property on all the major real estate websites, and give you all the real estate support you need to sell your own home and help you save thousands in agent commissions? You do now!
Contact the PropertyNow team to learn how easy it is to sell your home without an agent: